1st Mariner Blog: Financial Advice, Updates & More

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The 1st Mariner Blog is written by 1st Mariner Bank employees and associates who provide financial advice and write about topics they know matter to you. Our branches send us blog topic ideas all the time based on your questions and interests, so we can be sure that the content we publish is relevant to you.

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Season's Greetings and Happy New Year!

by Stacy Tharp 17. December 2014

As we near the end of 2014, we'd like to give an extra special thank you to our valued customers and friends. Your continued loyalty and support drives us to deliver the best personal service possible. We wish you, your families and your friends a wonderful holiday season. Enjoy the eCard below, made especially for you!

Spread the Word about Fraud Scams with the FTC’s “Pass It On” Campaign

by Stacy Tharp 11. December 2014

At 1st Mariner, keeping our customers educated about identity theft and other fraud scams is always a top priority.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC)’s educational campaign, Pass It On, takes things a step further. The campaign was created to encourage consumers to not only educate themselves about consumer protection issues, but to pass on the information to others.

The campaign is targeted to the older generation since this age group is a common target demographic, and the consequences can be more severe to these people. The idea is to allow older people to become part of the solution to the growing problem of consumer fraud, not just the victims.

However, the information the FTC provides is useful to people of all ages, as anyone can become a victim of a scam. Click here to visit the Pass It On page where you can find articles, activities, presentations and bookmarks – all for free. How can you tell if you’re paying too much on your bills? How do you spot a heath care scam? This information and much more can be found on the Pass It On page. The only thing asked of you is that you then do your part by passing it on to someone else.

Pass It On

If you found this article useful, be sure to check out these related articles:

It's Fraud Season: Protect Yourself

How Identity Thieves Steal Your Information

Top Three Myths about Online Banking Revealed

4 Ways to Avoid Overdrawing Your Account

by Andrew Schreiber 10. December 2014

Where does all the money go?

Overdrawing your account can be a common occurrence for some and it can be a rare occasion for others. Either way, the hefty fine that goes along with it is enough to make you want to avoid the incident altogether. Here are a few tips to mitigate the risk of overdrawing your account.

1) Use Mobile Banking

Using mobile banking is a great way to always know the current balance in your account. It's a great solution that practically anyone with any type of phone can use. If you have an old school flip phone, you can use text banking. This is a great way to find out your balance quickly before making a purchase. Those that have smartphones have the ability to download bank apps, and some banks offer Mobile Browsers as an alternative if they do not have an app for your specific device.

2) Use a Credit Card

Credit cards are good product for customers that are more financially responsible. Instead of having to worry about each and every transaction in a given month, you only need to make one payment a month. This is definitely something that should be used by individuals who are cognizant of what they spend. Those who have a shopping problem or don’t feel comfortable managing a monthly budget probably shouldn’t use this tactic.

3) Get Online Alerts

Most banks offer alerts through their online banking service. You can receive an email and/or text message for any activity you define. For example, you can set it up so you receive an alert if your balance falls below $100. This is a great way to notify yourself that you are getting close to overdrawing your account.

4) Store Extra Cash

This is a good tactic for those who still balance a checkbook, which fewer and fewer people are doing these days. You put additional cash in your account and try to forget it's there. That way, in case you accidentally think you overdraw your account, that buffer cash will cover it. If you track your balances electronically, you may not find this approach to be as beneficial.

If you found this article useful, be sure to check out these related articles:

3 Things to Consider when Choosing a Bank

The Importance of Reviewing Your Beneficiaries

Establishing Credit for Beginners



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