Bmore Secure and Shred-it!

by Stacy Tharp 14. May 2014

Shred-it Baltimore Team

This week is National Small Business Week and we wanted to share our support for our local entrepreneurs by showcasing one of our small business customers, Shred-it Baltimore.

Information fraud has been the fastest growing crime in the country over the past five years, according to Pru and Lee Miller, owners of Shred-it Baltimore. Shred-it specializes in secure information destruction services including paper shredding and hard drive and media destruction.

Shred-it Baltimore's strong commitment to customer service and satisfaction has allowed them to stand out as one of the leaders in the document and data destruction industry. Not-so-coincidentally, 1st Mariner’s same commitment to customer service is what compels Shred-it to bank with 1st Mariner.

Shred-it Baltimore

In an effort to raise awareness and promote prevention of consumer fraud and identity theft, Shred-it organizes Community Shred-it™ events. These events give individuals the opportunity to have their confidential documents destroyed on site, for a minimal fee or donation to a local charity.

Shred-it is hosting three community events this Saturday, May 17th in Baltimore, Bel Air and Annapolis. You can find more information on their website.

"It's rewarding to know that we run a business that provides a unique and necessary service to the businesses and residences in the Greater Baltimore metro area,” says Pru.

Shred-it Baltimore also creates employment opportunities for 50 residents.

According to the Millers, individuals and businesses must protect information in every imaginable way these days. The Shred-it website contains many free resources to improve information security and reduce the risk of fraud.

Orange You Glad O's Opening Day Is Just around the Corner?

by Stacy Tharp 27. March 2014

Have you found yourself dreaming about the smell of Esskay hot dogs, the crunch of empty peanut shells beneath your feet, the perfect balance of a cold beer on a hot day, the eruption of cheers surrounding you? If you have experienced these symptoms, then you, my friend, have a bad case of Orioles Fever. Yes, it is contagious, and it has been spreading like wildfire over these past couple weeks.

Before you find yourself getting into trouble at work trying to start the wave in Conference Room B, we have just the place for you to channel your O's energy!

Join us TOMORROW in celebrating the start to the O’s season with WBAL Radio. They’ll be bringing their “Orange You Glad It’s Friday” caravan to our Canton Tower location (3301 Boston St, Baltimore, MD) on Friday, March 28th from 9:30 – 10:00 a.m.

What can you expect at the Orange You Glad It's Friday party?

  • Get your car decked out with the Orioles/WBAL car stencil
  • Pick up a pair of orange and black sunglasses
  • Get in on the chance to win Orioles game tickets

We're on the edge of our seats with excitement for Opening Day - the official start to summer in Baltimore (says me, that's who). We look forward to seeing YOU tomorrow! Go O's!

How Identity Theives Steal Your Information

by Stacy Tharp 12. March 2014

Types of Identity Theft Experienced in 2012 There has been a lot of discussion recently around criminals getting ahold of private information via large-scale corporate data breaches. However, it still remains much easier for identity thieves to steal personal information through social engineering methods. Also known as “people hacking,” social engineering refers to tactics used to manipulate people into giving up their information, often by exploiting their natural tendency to be trustworthy and helpful.

It's unfortunate, but in today’s world we have to be careful who we trust and what information we share. Here are some common forms of social engineering that identity thieves like to use:

Impersonation

Impersonation is exactly what it sounds like – a criminal will pretend they are someone else in order to gain a person’s trust. For example, someone may call you and say that he/she is a representative of your financial institution and needs to verify your account information for some reason or another. Your first instinct may be to give the polite individual the information, because it is human nature to want to be helpful. But it is important to remember that your financial institution should never be contacting you requesting account or other private information. If you are unsure about a phone call you receive from someone claiming to be from your financial institution, kindly tell the representative that you will call back, then call the customer service line found on the financial institution’s website.

Shoulder Surfing

Beware of lurkers. Shoulder surfers will put themselves in a physical position that enables them to observe when a victim is typing confidential information. At an ATM, criminals may try to peer over your shoulder to watch you type in your PIN. Or they may try to snap a photo of your credit card number in the grocery store checkout line with their cell phone. Always be aware of your surroundings when you are completing a financial transaction in a public place.

Dumpster Diving

Do people actually go through your dirty trash in the off chance they may find personal information that they could use to steal your identity? You bet. To avoid someone getting your information this way, make sure you shred or securely destroy all hard copies of documents containing your private information. Enroll in electronic bank statements and electronic bills whenever possible to limit the number of hard copies you need to worry about.

Phishing

Phishing scams make use of the internet to try to capture people’s information, such as their passwords, credit card numbers, and bank account details. A criminal may send a fraudulent email claiming to be from a person’s financial institution – much like impersonation. The email will try to encourage its recipients to click on a link and enter or update their personal information, maybe stating that the financial institution lost some of its data. These phishing emails often include a threat that your account will be blocked if you do not enter your information. The information that a person enters then goes straight to the criminal who will do what they please with your personal information.

To avoid being a victim of a phishing scam, do not respond to any email requesting your personal information, and report any suspicious emails to your financial institution. It’s also a good idea to bookmark login screens, and use the bookmarked page every time you log in to your accounts.

For more tips on protecting your information, visit our Security and Fraud Prevention Center, and check out these five key tips from the FDIC for National Consumer Protection Week. When it comes to protecting your identity, it’s always better to be safe than sorry.

If you found this article useful, be sure to check out these related articles:

Top 3 Myths about Online Banking Revealed

It's 11:00 p.m. Do You Know Where Your Money Is?

5 Mobile Banking Security Tips



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