Why Buy Local?

by Wade Barnes 25. April 2013

Buy Local, Buy MarylandConsider this: A tomato seed planted hundreds of miles away takes the journey through life and makes its way to the grocery store chain in your neighborhood. Along this journey, the tomato was likely picked when it was still green so that it wouldn’t be rotten from the time it takes to get from the farm to the store. Not only this, but typically tomatoes don’t grow well when picked pre-maturely nor do they ripen organically while inside a trailer being pulled across the country. To accommodate this, hormones and preservatives are oftentimes applied so the final delivery yields a perfectly ripened tomato.

Because this tomato was packaged in a huge crate, treated with stimulants, hauled across hundreds of miles, and delivered to your local grocery store chain, the final product is both less than organic and has significant overhead costs considering its journey. When you buy this tomato from the local grocery store chain, the money spent now goes back to the town where the store is headquartered, to the trucking firm who transported the shipment, and to the farmer who grew the produce - none of whom live in your community nor contribute to your community’s well-being.

While this example may seem specific, it represents the system of commerce we’ve all come to accept. Consider the opportunity to buy local goods from local businesses and imagine the impact this could have on our economy, on our health, and on our communities.

When you buy local, money stays in the local community. Local producers have the opportunity to provide products and services to local retailers. Local retailers will hire local employees to sell these products and services to local shoppers. In short, jobs are created in our communities, which creates a sustainable revenue stream so that more people have the capacity to buy more goods and services.

When local people are gainfully employed and when we buy local, cities and townships benefit with increased tax revenue. While we all may cringe at the thought of taxes, it is great to know that the taxes paid benefit our immediate community. This means better schools, smoother roads, and better public health and safety.

While economics may be inspiring, it is by far not the only consideration. When you buy local, you get a product that is much more closely related to the producer. This means better quality, fewer preservatives, lower transportation costs, less pollution during transportation and better products and services to keep you coming back.

This concept even applies to banking. By being a local community bank, you have access to local experts, local advice, and local decision making, which is the foundation of our core values. When you bank local, you keep jobs in our communities, you get great products and services, and you don’t only get a bank, you get a partner in the industry who cares about you, your business and your community.

As we are committed to the buy local initiative, we are the title sponsor of the Buy Local, Buy Maryland campaign. We hope you check out this initiative and make the choice to support your local businesses and buy local.

If you enjoyed this article, be sure to check out these other related articles:

Buy Local, Bank Local

7 Ways to Save Money Recycling

The Cheap Guide to Father's Day in Baltimore

7 Ways to Save Money Recycling

by Stacy Levin 22. April 2013

Save Money Recycling

We recycle because it helps reduce waste and pollution. We recycle because it’s good for the environment. We recycle to make the world a better place for future generations. These are all good, selfless reasons to recycle, which is why many of us do it. But have you ever thought about what recycling can do specifically for YOU? Why not be kind to the environment AND save money recycling at the same time? Here are 7 ways you can do this:

1) Refill or return empty ink cartridges.

Bring your empty printer cartridges into participating Walgreens and they will refill them for $12.99 – generally much cheaper than purchasing a new cartridge. Alternatively, Office Depot and Staples give you member rewards dollars for bringing in your empty ink cartridges.

2) Put your old compact discs to good use.

Do you have a huge stack of old CDs from back in the day, before the age of iPods, smartphones and music streaming? They make great reflectors and can easily be attached to a child’s bike.

3) Trade in your old electronics.

Not sure what to do with your old cell phones and computers? Several retailers including Best Buy, Walmart and Target have trade-in programs in which you receive store credit for bringing in your old small electronics.

4) Recycle your wrapping paper.

After being used to wrap gifts, wrapping paper can then be used for things like textbook covers, scratch paper for making grocery lists and lots of other things that you would normally purchase. Click here for other creative ways to reuse wrapping paper.

5) Create your own Tupperware.

Before purchasing Tupperware, see what you can get out of old containers (yogurt, Chinese take-out, etc.) You might not get every shape and size you need, but it’s a good place to start!

6) Create new things out of your old clothes.

Whether your clothes no longer fit or have just lost their appeal, as long as the fabric is still in good shape you can make accessories such as bags or wallets. If this sounds too advanced for you, simply cut old jeans into shorts or use your old clothes as dust rags.

7) Join the Freecycle Network and get free stuff.

The Freecyle Network is a nonprofit movement of people dedicated to keeping quality items out of landfills. Join the group in your location for free and post items that you are trying to get rid of, as well as items you are looking for. You can often find things like furniture that people are trying to get rid of before a move and old toys from people whose children outgrew them.

If you found this article useful, be sure to check out these related articles:

FREE Shred-It Day

Is Growing a Garden "Worth It"?

4 Free Money Saving Apps

 

 

Stacy Levin

FREE Shred-It Day

by Renee' Anderson 15. April 2013

Free Shred-It Day

What do you do with your paper documents when you no longer need them? Toss them in the trash? You might want to reconsider that decision. I never thought much about shredding important documents, until we found out the trash men were going through our trash! It’s a scary feeling knowing that someone you don’t know has access to your personal information. Don’t let it happen to you - take advantage of 1st Mariner Bank’s FREE Shred-It Day!

1st Mariner Bank is holding a FREE Shred-It Day on Saturday April 27th. There will be Shred-It trucks at the Cockeysville and Dundalk branches from 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Just in time for Earth Day (April 20th) and spring cleaning! Not only is shredding your documents an important step in protecting against identity theft, it’s an easy way to help the environment.

So, if you have things like old paper bank statements lying around collecting dust, bring them to 1st Mariner’s FREE Shred-It Day on April 27th. And, by the way, if you are currently receiving paper bank statements, consider enrolling in electronic statements. Why? Enrolling in eStatements is a safe and secure way to receive your account information without crowding up your file cabinets (or if you’re like me, baskets in your kitchen stuffed with papers that you don’t have time to file/don’t feel like filing) and save some trees at the same time!

Go Green! Join us April 27th for 1st Mariner Bank’s FREE Shred-It Day, and enroll your accounts in eSatatements today!



© 2008- 1st Mariner Bank